admin on September 8th, 2017

This adventure, so far, was everything and nothing from what I expected. I was expecting, which all came true, to see poverty, weather changing from raining at 70 degrees to being under the boiling sun at 100 degrees, and turtles, of course. What I wasn’t expecting was seeing people with joy despite not having nicely paved roads, roofs with no leaks, constant hot water, and more things that some Americans cannot live without. Also, I wasn’t expecting that so many Mexicans were able to speak English and that they loved Football.  I do not know if it is where I am staying at but still, I am consistently amazed. This environment is great. You can feel the friendliness and joy of others.  People talk to each other when they are in the store or sitting at a bus stop. They are not shy and concentrated on their phones.  Do not get me wrong, a lot of Mexicans have smart phones, which means that a lot of them have their eyes glued to the screen.  This adventure was and is everything and nothing from what I expected.

When I first started off on the project, I was happy and full of energy to work, but over the course of three days, that energy teetered.  Not because I wasn’t enjoying the work, it was because of the constant rain and powerful winds.  Rain was always finding its way into my tent which drenched my items.  I have finally been able to find the perfect spot where I am not affected by the rain, but unfortunately, some of my things have a bad smell because of the rain.  My spirit is back to where it originally started, full of energy.

The conservation of the turtles is tiring work, partly because most of the work is at night to early morning.  It has become less tiring because I have been able to spot turtles, their tracks, and their nests a lot easier.  Because of this, I have been collecting, on average, about 500 eggs a night. With these eggs, I sell them on the black market. Sorry, bad joke.  If I were to do this, it would land me at least 7 years in jail. I actually relocate them to a protected area where I build them a new nest. This area protects the turtles from predators and poachers. There we can make sure the baby turtles make it safely to the ocean.  After that, they are on their own. The biologist said that we can average about 5 female turtles, per nest, will live and come back to the beach to nest.  We can average none if this project was not in place.

I am so thankful that I have been able to experience all of this. There is much that I have seen and not written yet, and there is a lot that I have not seen.  Thank you to everyone who supported me financially, through prayers, or any other way. I would not have been able to do this without you.

admin on September 8th, 2017

The day has arrived. I have taken my first step to a grand adventure. Thank you so much to the people who have supported me in any way that you could. Thank you to LifeSuppprtM for giving me the push and the help on this trip. I would not have been able to do it with out them.

admin on April 25th, 2017

Two weeks in Tecate, Mexico, building homes and helping in the kitchen (La Cocinca). We also donated our trailer. Thank you to all our donors and supporters for sending us to do this wonderful work!

admin on November 16th, 2016

Each time we go on a house building mission to Mexico, Jeff and I reflect on how grateful we are to be able to be of service. We are continually moved by the generosity of our donors to send us out on this work, and we are especially moved by the heart and soul of the families we build for. We were blessed on this mission to have with us, another of my Dominican University of California work colleagues, Henry Jamison, Sr.

      

And, we are, of course, always grateful for the work of Amor.org and the pastors in Mexico that make it possible for us, and all who wish to participate, to come to Mexico to help families stay together.

      

On this mission there were three families who received homes, built by a group of over 60 folks from across the United States. The home that Jeff, Henry and I worked on was for the Munguia Lopez family. The neighborhood was in eastern Tijuana, in the town of Valle Verde where the streets in the neighborhood were names like Valor, Dignity, Cooperation, and in our case, Sincerity. These street names were especially poignant because we saw how the family we built for, and their neighbors, came together not only in the building of the house, but also recently during a terrible tragedy. Only one month before our arrival, the father of our family, Norberto, lost his home to a devastating fire. The fire leveled Norberto’s home and several others. But the most tragic loss was that of Norberto’s 32-year old son, Manuel, and Norberto’s best friend, Jorge, when the fire caused the house to collapse as Manuel raced back in to save Jorge.

      

Each family that we have built for in our twenty years of mission work has had a unique story and they have often expressed to us how their home will be the beginning of a great new chapter – for Norberto it will be a bittersweet new chapter, the joy of a new home tempered by the grief of his loss. His surviving children and grandchildren do live close by, and one of his daughters, Veronica, and her three young children, will be moving into the new house with Norberto.

      

In this time in the world it can feel like things are falling apart, and in Norberto’s world, that is most true. But, at the same time, there is hope, there is cooperation, there is dignity, and there is valor – in every word and deed we have the ability to make the world a better place with love, and with sincerity.

Blessings to all, from Leona and Jeff and LifeSupportM.org

 

admin on November 9th, 2016

Thank you to our many donors for your generosity toward our upcoming House Building Mission to Mexico and our donation visit to Casa Hogar Sion Orphanage. With your contributions we will be able to bring a first time Mexico House Building team member, Henry Jamison, Sr., with us on the trip. On our way, we will be dropping off a truck full of supplies, diapers, and clothing – and a check for $400! – to Casa Hogar Sion Orphanage. We look forward to sharing more photos and stories from our trip when we return. Thank you for helping us help families and children in need, and share love, generosity, and understanding across cultures.

admin on August 3rd, 2016

Tijuana, Mexico: House building for the Sarabia-Diaz family. Their new home is next door to their parents and grandparents homes where the family raises their own goats, rabbits, and chickens. Pablo works at one of the factories in town and Luz works at a local grocery store. Pablo and Luz are expecting their first child in December and they are grateful that they will now have a safe home, close to their parents, so they can all be together when the baby comes.

The house building team, thanks to Amor.org, consisted of folks of all ages from Henderson, Nevada; Southern California; and Northern California. The Northern California crew, representing LifeSupportM.org, was Jeff, Leona, and Daniel Estrada (Leona’s work colleague at Dominican University of California).

Thanks to our generous LifeSupportM.org donors, and the Dominican University of California’s Kathryn McGovern Community Service Award,  for helping us raise the funds for the mission – especially since it gave us the ability to welcome Daniel to the Life Support Crew! And, thank you to all the administrative staff, Mexico pastors, camp staff, field staff, and fellow team members that make these missions possible.

p.s. The week before we built for the Sarabia-Diaz family, Jeff built a double wide home for a family just down the street. So many blessings for making good things happen in the world!

 

admin on April 17th, 2016

Co-Founder, Jeff Davidson, from Marin County, traveled to Tijuana, Mexico, and Tecate, Mexico for a house building mission. Jeff spent three weeks working in collaboration with Amor.org and the amazing youth volunteers from across the US and with other mentors working directly with the youth.

Jeff Davidson, Co-Founder, working on a house in Mexico

Jeff Davidson, Co-Founder, working on a house in Mexico

Jono Reed, Dave Hotler, And Co-Founder Jeff Davidson on one of the work sites.

Jeff Davidson (Co-founder of LifeSupportM.org on the right) volunteered along with Jono Reed, Dave Hotler, Amor Staffers (lefter and center, respectively) on one of the work sites.

This project worked on 20 houses, completing 15 of them, for local at-risk and impoverished families. Jeff also delivered a donation of $255.00 (US) to the Casa Hogar Sion Orphanage to assist them in furthering their mission of providing shelter and support to orphan children. The money goes towards necessities such as clothing, shoes, and toiletries.

Youth volunteers coming from across the US to work with Amor in building these homes of hope.

Youth volunteers coming from across the US to work with Amor in building these homes of hope.

Jeff, working alongside more Amor volunteers.

Jeff, working alongside more Amor volunteers.

Two young girls from one of the deserving families, along with their adorable puppy, watching their new home being built.

Two young girls from one of the deserving families, along with their adorable puppy, watching their new home being built.

A happy deserving family waiting with excitement to see their new "casa" being built.

A happy deserving family waiting with excitement to see their new “casa” being built.

One of the new homes in the process of being completed.

One of the new homes in the process of being completed.

Another house being constructed by the amazing volunteers.

Another house being constructed by the amazing volunteers.

Local women volunteers and vendors making fresh churros.

Local women volunteers and vendors making fresh churros.

Another little boy (with another sweet puppy) from another family watching his future home becoming a reality.

Another little boy (with another sweet puppy) from another family watching his future home becoming a reality.

admin on August 6th, 2015

Tijuana, Mexico: Building homes and building relationships!

Thank you to our generous donors for helping us make good things happen in the world!

admin on March 14th, 2015


Along with learning how to garden, compost and care for chickens and the land, LifeSupportM.org’s COMFY Garden youth volunteers discuss, explore, and practice a broader set of life skills in the areas of Money Management, Time Management, Leadership and Ethics, Relationships, Listening Without Fixing, Team Building, and Life Planning. Looking forward to seeing what grows from the seeds of life that are planted this spring!

COMFY Garden Welcome and Permission Form

admin on November 12th, 2014

Thank you team members, donors, family, and friends for sending us out
into the world to do good works – and congratulations, Brooke, on
accomplishing the first leg of your around the world adventure!